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#141499
Richard
Richard
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Q: Most interesting recording you own? A: It's a mysteriously beautiful recording from, I am told, Robbie Robertson's label. It's of crickets. That's right, crickets. The first time I heard it… I swore I was listening to the Vienna Boys Choir, or the Mormon Tabernacle choir. It has a four-part harmony. It is a swaying choral panorama. Then a voice comes in on the tape and says, “What you are listening to is the sound of crickets. The only thing that has been manipulated is that they slowed down the tape.” No effects have been added of any kind, except that they changed the speed of the tape. The sound is so haunting. I played it for Charlie Musselwhite, and he looked at me as if I pulled a Leprechaun out of my pocket.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/allsongs/2008/05/an_interview_with_tom_waits_by.html
Dice che e solo rallentato

http://www.constancedemby.com/godscricketchorus_f.html
Rallentato per simulare la durata di una vita umana

http://bryanappleyard.com/robert-wilsons-slow-time/
Crickets live for a few weeks — 21 days, says Robert Wilson, though research suggests this figure is a bit low. Humans traditionally live for three score years and 10 — or, now, four score years and 10. What would you do with this information if you were the most fêted, admired director, choreographer, video artist, designer in the world? Well, this is what he, Wilson, did. He brought in another great artist, the American singer-songwriter Tom Waits, and recorded the stridulations — the correct word for the songs — of a mass of crickets. Waits then slowed down the recording by the ratio of the human life span to that of the crickets. What you hear, then, is the song of crickets as if they lived as long as humans.