Rispondi a: Ho scoperto un oggetto non identificato sul suolo della Luna usando Google Moon

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#26767

Omega
Partecipante

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a nord ovest del l'astronautino di apollo 11….
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La [color=#0077dd]spiegazione di Google[/color] (cliccando sul punto interrogativo) è che si tratta di un errore chimico nello sviluppo e successiva scansione dei negativi da parte delle apparecchiature dei satelliti Lunar Orbiter – all'epoca non c'era la fotocamera digitale:

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Wondering what this is? No, it's not an alien colony. It is a processing artifact in this image of the Moon, which was taken by one of the Lunar Orbiter satellites in the mid-1960s.

The Lunar Orbiter camera system was a marvel of engineering for its time. Built long before the advent of digital sensors, the Lunar Orbiter camera captured images on black and white film that was developed on the spacecraft and then scanned with an electron gun and photo-multiplier tube, one strip at a time. The image data was then beamed back to earth as a TV signal where another system exposed film on the Earth to match the film in space, and this transfer back to film was developed using another chemical process. The entire apparatus for capturing, processing, scanning, and transmitting the photographs was all housed in a pressurized, thermally controlled container. Needless to say, there were many opportunities for imperfections to creep in.

Surprisingly, the Lunar Orbiter images are still the best images available of much of the Moon, and this is one of many reasons why NASA and other space agencies are sending a new generation of satellites to the Moon over the next few years.

You can learn more about these artifacts, and the work currently underway to digitally scan all the old Lunar Orbiter imagery, from the U.S. Geological Survey.

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